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20121031
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, security guards and so on. narrator: the jobs given to locals are often at the lower pay levels. then agmeade:he work may there's not an awful lot of other ways to make a living. ere's inteive wet rice farming-- with all its very hard labor-- and there's some local fishing, although the international fisheries and the japanese trawlers have really hurt that. narrator: seventy percent of the locals now re on tourismfor their inco. and with theew jobs comes the requirement to learn at least some english. if you met a guest in the corridor here, and he asks you, "where is the laundry?" what would you say? how would you answer him? sardjano: most of these young people come from the villages around the hotels. at our hotel, for instance, 60% of the staff are fromhe island of bali i. that's why they are mostly hindu. the other 40% come from java and other parts of indonesia. that's why they are mostly muslims or christian. excellent. your english is very good. you should be working in the front office. ( teaching staff in local language ) narrator: the mix of cultures within the workforce at t
that agricultural landscape. narrator: laos is not a democracy. even if local people wish to protest the elimination of their landscapes and lifestyles, even if local people they have few options. fox: geographers might think of them as "powerless place," and these corporations, in a world of globalization and global finance, might be thought of as "placeless power." and when those come together in time and space, it can have perhaps some unprecedented geographical impacts. i think the question needs to be... eds toe aske is this a viable long-term development strategy? will it...n 30 or 40 years, will these dams still be generating enough electricity to produce significant revenues, and even though it may increase the total g.n.p.-- or gross national product-- of laos, how will it actually impact people. narrator: but for now, laos's plans for engagement in the global economy are focused on exploiting its water resources and overcoming its geographic isolation by developing its transportation infrastructure. new roads are planned to link china and thailand with seapos in vietnam. suthernd: the coun
the infrastructure erode to the point where the local and state health agencies couldn't do their normal baseline functions to monitor-- what we consider the essential role, which is to monitor the pulse of the health of their populations. david bennett: in some marginalized populations and in people in jails and prisons, we found we had a big challenge on our hands, and there was a wake up call, a good response, and i think we've now turned the corner, but hopefully, we've learned our lessons, that the fact that we're now seeing a decline in tuberculosis doesn't give us any guarantees for the future. another thing that haunts me is, now, there are other much more common problems such as measles and some of these other ones for which, in the case of measles, we've had a perfectly good intervention now for more than 30 years and have not used it. we're using it more and more now to help reduce it, but there are several other problems. measles, polio, mumps, and chicken pox. the vaccine-preventable diseases of childhood are rarely seen in the industrialized nations of the world because of the immun
in their localities for long periods of time. like in many places, the squatters in delhi, many of them have been there for a decade or more. narrator: continual population pressures have also led to an explosion in the number of cars on the road, degrading air quality and bringing traffic to a virtual standstill. at the same time, factories are spewing tons of pollutants into the air. i think nothing has frightened me more than the change in air quality that you experience nowadays when you travel to delhi. when you land in the city, the first thing that you are aware of as you exit your airplane is the thickness of the air that surrounds you. it almost has a physical presence in terms of its quality because there's so much dust and particulate matter-- fumes from cars, industrial emissions and manufacturing emissions-- that the quality of the air is... is and feels very dangerous. it's not uncommon to go for a walk in delhi for half an hour and to come back with black coating around the outside of your nostrils or on your clothes. and it's really been assessed by the world health organization a
suffer. water quality is often perceived as a local or regional issue, as is the case of the guinea worm. but the very fact that water circulates around the globe and through the soil, means that contamination in one area eventually spreads. rebecca goldberg: the ocean has historically been treated as so vast that we can do anything to it and it doesn't matter. cities have pumped vast quantities of untreated sewage into the ocean. new york city has dumped garbage in the ocean. ships have thrown their wastes overboard or discharged their sewage directly overboard without treatment. the beaches of imperial beach, california, a seaside community south of san diego, are closed during much of the year because high levels of pollution pose a danger to swimmers and surfers. two miles to the south is the city of tijuana, mexico. almost half of the homes and businesses in this rapidly growing urban area are not connected to a sewer system. ababout half a mile short of that two miles is the mouth of the tijuana river, where a million acre watershed pours water and unconnected sewage from homes tha
. that is destruction interference. the eye gonna see nothing. you're not gonna see this in your local environment. what you will see in your local environment is white light from the sun. the sunlight coming down and hitting the gasoline on a rainy day. you've all noticed that. you notice that? it's gotta be a rainy day that the gasoline gives you the color. why? 'cause the gasoline gotta float on water to give you two surfaces to make reflection from, yeah? okay? now, when white light hits for this particular thickness, the blue is gone. you check with your neighbor and see if your neighbor knows. if the blue is gone from the white reflecting, what color is the eye gonna see? go. what's it gonna be, gang? - green. - something. how many say a yellow or an orange or something like that? yeah, yeah the complementary color of that shade of blue, yeah? we talked about this. we talked about the blue sky, remember? the blue sky scatters off blue. so given enough sky for the light to get through by the time light gets to you and all the blue is scattered, what do you get left, gang? you get the complementary
to locals are often at the lower pay levels. then agmeade:he work may there's not an awful lot of other ways to make a living. ere's inteive wet rice farming-- with all its very hard labor-- and there's some local fishing, although the international fisheries and the japanese trawlers have really hurt that. narrator: seventy percent of the locals now re on urismfor their income. and with theew jobs comes the requirement to learn at least some english. if you met a guest in the corridor here, and he asks you, "where is the laundry?" what would you say? how would you answer him? sardjano: most of these young people come from the villages around the hotels. at our hotel, for instance, 60% of the staff are fromhe island of bali i. that's why they are mostly hindu. the other 40% come from java and other parts of indonesia. that's why they are mostly muslims or christian. excellent. your english is very good. you should be working in the front office. ( teaching staff in local language ) narrator: the mix of cultures within the workforce at the hotels results from a government policy encouraging p
been plagued with corruption among top management. and all too often, entrenched local interests see foreign firms as unwanted competition that will upset the status quo. among state-owned enterprises, the shenyang machine tool works is doing better than most. today it is 60% state-owned and 40% privately owned. it recently provided equipment for the maglev railroad extension for e w shanai airport and it has begun repaying its world bank loan. while the tool works still struggles with the effects of restructuring, its example holds promise for the northeast's future. and geographer li remains hopeful. ( li speaking chinese ) translator: in recent years, shenyang has been working on product development, on upgrading its plants and equipment, adopting new technologies and attracting overseas investment. it has achieved significant results with the establishment of the shenyang economic and technical development zone and the revitalization of the tiexi industrial zone. these efforts are paying off in the renewal of shenyang's industrial base. i believe that the region will grow to play
in the suburbs can board a train at their local station and ride any of the spokes directly to one of the central stations such as tokyo, otemachi or ginza. i think that there are few systems like this one in other countries. narrator: saitama prefecture is one of the fastest-growing areas where workers can still find an affordable home. sako toshiakworks as a department manager in a major cosmetics firm. he moved to his house in saitama prefecture back in the 1970s his children were young. ( speaking japanese ) translator: the air here is really clean. i remember when first moved here how pretty the stars were. bere that, we halid in an artment near the company. maybe it was the neon signs, but you could hardly see any stars. i was really happy to move to such a nice place. narrator: sako leaves every morning at:00 a.m. and will commute about 20 miles to central tokyo. but as more people have moved to the suburbs, they've burdened the train system. sako has two options: the first will take 90 minutes door to door. after boarding a fast train, he transfers to a subway train. however, because thi
can see this plant that's floating. it's a water lily. locally, it's called wachinango. and this is one of the keys to the success of chinampa farming. this reproduces very rapidly and it's used as fertilizer. they collect it with a pitchfork-like tool, fill up these boats, and they throw it up on the chinampa. and in five days of work, they can fertilize an entire chinampa. and that's enough to crop successively all kinds of garden crops for 12 months out of the year. and then next year you go through the same process. keach: with chinampa agriculture, the aztecs could sustain a large population and draft armies larger than any competitor. agriculture was a key ingredient in a system that made the conquest state possible. by the turn of the 16th century, the aztec empire was a well-oiled machine that appeared unstoppable. in 1519, there were no evidences of any significant internal stresses in the aztec empire. it looked as though it was going to continue for at least another hundred years. in fact, they had contacted the highland maya as far away as guatemala -- had r
go for a walk by myself around isaac walton or in our local forest preserve, and no one's with me, but i'm just feeling myself and what's around and communing with nature, i guess. >> yes. yes. >> it's a very healing force. i mean, people say, well, why do you want to live in mccomb, out in the middle of nowhere, but there's a peace that comes to that. i mean, one of my peak experiences that i do regularly is there's a beautiful, beautiful hilly park with a lake in the middle out there, and because there's no people in western illinois anyway, there's nobody in the park. and so, i'm running all these trails, and it's like being inside of nature, just totally connected in the running, in the movement, in the air, the earth - all the elements are right there, and it's very renewing, it really is. and these kinds of experiences are - they're lost on us, and even if you live in the country, there's that element in the urban atmosphere that draws us away, either through tv or whatever. yeah, warren? >> i was thinking of a psychologist, jung, and his idea of the collective unconsciousne
influences was kenny isaacs. kenny isaacs was a local boxing hero. and i was one of these kids that was getting beat up all the time by bullies. i wasn't much of a physical specimen. and kenny isaacs was-- he was the fighter of fighters. everyone admired that guy. i remember going to lynn and watching him fight sometimes. i was about maybe 14 years old, 13, 14, and saying, "wow, this guy is so great." i wish i could be there in his corner, be sort of the kid that comes up with the water bucket, you know, and helps him. this is a gladiator, no one beat him up. but anyway, kenny isaacs was a big influence because, to make a long story short, three years later, kenny isaacs was in my corner. and a fellow lived next door to me, eddie mccarthy, who was a professional fighter, 135-pound, lightweight, very good guy. and he took me under his wing. but then he went off to the korean war. just before he did that, he turned me over to a local boxing hero, kenny isaacs. and he told kenny, "kenny, take young paul here under your wing. he's my protege." kenny did that. and i was gonna retire
, "i've never looked any further than just around my local--" come on, come on, okay? and there's another thing too. you guys don't be knowing about- distant, distant mountains that are covered with show that are very, very bright, far, far away, don't look white. they look, kind of, yellowish. like, some of the blue didn't make it to your eye. i wonder how come distant bright things look yellowish, and distant dark things look bluish? in fact, when you look up at the sky, it's all blue. guess what the background is, the darkness of outer space. the astronauts get up. they're looking down to the same sky. they're looking straight down. here's the globe right here. did they see the blue? no. they don't see the blue. what do they see? the color of the earth. we look out, we see blue. they look down and say, "i don't see no blue." they wouldn't say, "i don't see no blue," that means they do see blue, yeah? they see that off at the edge, okay? but what's going on here, gang? think about these ideas. we'll be talking about it again, okay? [music]
may shift from one locality to another over a long period of time. distributaries play a vital role in building and enlarging a delta, intermittently supplying new sediment to all parts of the delta's shore. the mississippi river has built one of the largest deltas in the world. nearly 40,000 square kilometers of land have been added to the state of louisiana due to the astonishing power of the mississippi river and its enormous amount of sediment. one million tons of silt, sand, and clay are added to the mississippi delta each day, giving the river its nickname-- the big muddy. the mississippi could not have created this much land if it had stayed in one channel. the southern part of the river has changed course many times over an area some 300 kilometers wide. the key to these changes is the river's natural tendency to follow the path of least resistance, which is almost always the shortest route to the sea. the mississippi follows a single channel until gradually its channel fills with sediment. at that point, the river easily overtops its banks during periods of high discharge.
interesting. if a foundation breaks down on a barn, well, you call the local cement truck to save it. but if the amish from time to time seem to strike a bargain with modern times, and if their customs- and sometimes these customs seem quaint or lly- are a bargain, it's a bargain that has allowed them to protect amish culture. they might turn around and ask the english- a term they use for anyone outside their group- "what do your secular beliefs bring you? we have beautiful farms, a simple life. you run off to cities, take jobs you hate, lock your parents in homes when they get old, don't have the sense of family we have, don't have the sense of beauty in a quiet, agricultural life." in fact, these believers are doing just fine, thank you. not only have they kept the modern world with all its problems at bay, nationally, they have grown from a meager band of 5,000 in 1900 to over 100,000 today. and their farms survive while many modern farms are failing. in fact, they survive very well, and simplicity and beauty and a sense of family and community. so the dilemma of the amish faith
or simply the local community mosque, these sacred structures are the center of the community, guiding all other aspects of islamic life. at al- aqsa, mohammed learned by divine revelation to pray five times a day, and so to this day, this central ritual activity, inspired by myth and guided by doctrine, defines identity and relationship in the muslim world. >> now, having seen that, hold your wonderful good questions here because i've got to get the sheik in here, the sufi sheik, and we're down to, you know, ten minutes or so. but let's go to the next roll-in. we went to a completely average- if there is such a thing- a traditional muslim family in the town of cana- that's where jesus turned the water into wine, that's where that miracle happened. well, this is a muslim family living in cana, attempting to get along with the jewish community and the christian community, and what binds them together, as you can well imagine at this point in time, is of course the five pillars of islam. so let's hear from a traditional muslim family in israel. >> that was a thing that you first want to conf
with the sweet pea. >> besides selling to local chefs, san miguel produce is actually behind one of the most innovative products in the leafy greens market for consumers these days--bagged cooking greens. launched in 1996, it was the first packaged form of cooking greens in the united states. the idea all goes back to the 1970s when roy and his 2 partners were in the vegetable and lettuce business and saw the trend in the bagged salad market and wondered if there wasn't something else they could grow to distinguish themselves from the pack. >> after looking at some of the research, said there might be a market for this. so in 1995 was when we started to transition more of the ground to dedicated toward these leafy greens--the collards, mustards, turnips, kales. now--which was-- now we're up to about 17 different varieties, including organics. >> we're out here in a collard field. we grow collards year round here in california. it happens to be one of our biggest commodities for cooking greens. the crew out here today is hand-harvesting the various products. what they do is, they pull the out
ladies and gentlemen for the better by informing them about her beloved lemons, and that includes local chefs who pop by for a visit. >> i adore meyers, but i also thought since they're dwarfs, they were especially appropriate for me. hs] >> they don't get too big. i try to pick no lemon before its time, so when it gets to be-- >> yeah, how do you know when it's ready? >> the color. >> ok. >> you're looking for the-- the deepest orange color. it's a cross between a mandarin orange and a lemon. >> karen is just a--a wonderful, wonderful person. she has such a kind soul, and, uh, she treats these lemons like they're each individual, like they're one of her children. and it's so wonderful to have somebody that appreciates that so much, what comes fro-from the earth. and we're an organic, seasonal restaurant, and so we really appreciate supporting the farmer. >> ursula gets to support farmers every night at the flea st. cafe in nearby menlo park. there, they try to honor their local hardworking artisan farmers like karen, who grow and produce nurturing, farm-fresh foods. along with desserts
: higher up the volcanic ss is a rief sculpture that t local pple call "el y," the king. like the tes ala venta, it shows the figure seated within a cave. grov above the cave are three trobedn ouds. this is a fantastic rain and fertility scene up on the hillside. it's placed right beside the major drainage of rainwater runoff from the hillside. thhiside cvi em to ben petions to ensure ertility for peopel onhear weshe cvi ths ryonent,n petions which call the "flying olme" when i first saw it, i noticed that the headdress on the flying person was very much like nument 19 in la vea. not identical, but they were carved in the same way. so there is a connection in some of the art at chaltzingo with la venta's art. thlocation of chalcatzingo, a huge series of valley systems coming together, sort of suggests that maybe chalcaingo functioned as a gateway city through which goods from across central mexico, and perhaps even western mexico, funneled into chalcatzingo and then moved eastward toward the gulf coast. obre in the valley of mexico,n the tskirts ofexico city, archaeologts have excavated
scure at t local people call"el "g like the tes ala ven, it shows the figure seated within a cave. grov above the cave are three trobedn ouds. this is a fantastic rain and fertility scene up on the hillside. it's placed right beside the major drainage of rainwater runoff from the hillside. thhillside cvi for peeltionto ensure erli on f weshes ry monent, which call the "flying olme" when i first saw it, i noticed that the headdress on the flying person was very much like nument 19 in la vea. not identical, but they were carved in theame way. so there is a connection in some of the art at chaltzingo with la venta's art. thlocation of chalcatzingo, a huge series of valley systems coming together, sort of suggests that maybe chalcatzingo functioned as a gateway city through which goods from across central mexico, and perhaps even western mexico, funneled into chalcatzingo and then moved eastward toward the gulf coast. obrego in the valley of mexico, on the outskirts of mexico city, archaeologists have excavated graves from about 900 b.c. containing clay figures and pottery of the olmec sty
. fennel from a local farm over in yolo. >> but the bulk of this produce doesn't stay here very long. within a few hours, much of it is trucked out to restaurants and businesses in northern california, some delivered by mills himself. he spends hours on the road, visiting farmers and chefs, taking produce from one to the other, and educating both parties along the way. >> may need a look at the progress of a particular crop or report back, maybe some feedback, to the farmer about how the chefs are using it or what they might be looking for in the near future. >> in many ways, produce express and people like jim mills are the link between 1,300 different restaurants in northern california and produce from all over the golden state. today's visit took us to del rio botanical farm in yolo county, where suzanne peabody ashworth was keen to get restaurants to start trying the fresh fava beans and greens she's growing. >> so we'll take some of these greens into a couple of restaurants this morning and see what the chefs want to do with them. in sacramento, there's been an explosion of rest
and fresh for at least one week, maybe even two. and always remember--buy local, buy fresh, and buy california. >> hi, i'm richard slusarz, chef here at the grand hyatt san francisco. and the dish we're gonna prepare today is a roasted california chanterelles salad with goat cheese and a balsamic vinaigrette. the california chanterelles in season right now-- very wonderful, very beautiful, great flavor. so, why don't we go ahead and make the balsamic vinaigrette right now? so, we're gonna take a little bit of fresh herbs... just a little bit of minced shallot. i have a little bit of stone-ground mustard. take a little bit of balsamic vinegar. all right. and then i have a little california extra virgin olive oil. and the salad's gonna be somewhat deconstructed. but you can see how it makes a nice vinaigrette--very classic with the balsamic vinegar. in this case, i'm just using our spring greens. toss a little bit on this with our greens. then we'll go ahead and plate. then we're gonna take our roasted chanterelles. and again, you can see, now obviously, they've roasted, they've conce
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)

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